flat tax

Is there support for a flat tax?

In a commentary on CNN by Ruben Navarrette Jr., Billionaire Warren Buffett’s comments on unfair taxes continued to be addressed by politicians.

I asked Obama if he agreed with Buffett that the rich weren’t paying their fair share, and what he would do about it.

“There’s no doubt that the tax system has been skewed, ” Obama answered. “But I think this goes to a broader question, and that is, are we willing to make the investments in genuine equal opportunity in this country?

“People aren’t looking for charity, and one of the distressing things sometimes when we have a conversation about race in America is that we talk about welfare and we talk about poverty, but what people really want is fairness,” he said. “They want people paying their fair share of taxes.”

Navarrette co-signs the second paragraph, but believes Obama is more interested in switching the weight of the unfairness rather than fixing it.

Obama didn’t tackle tax reform during his first term, because it would have been the dimise of the Democratic party during his election run for a second term. With Democrats in power, a new tax code would weigh heavily on the party for years to come. Pushing for tax reform now, isn’t a such a bad idea considering Republicans are now wielding their power.

The American population wants tax reform. Polls continue to show support, but I don’t think they will like what they get.

The problem that exists in both political parties is that neither has the balls to put forth a solution for the long-term. Navarrette and I both agree,

The answer lies in a third way: a fairer, flatter tax that lets all Americans pay the same percentage of their income in taxes. Maybe it would be 15%. Or 17%. Or 20%. The specifics aren’t as important as the concept.

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